Iowa's Jesup Bridge: From Beginning to End

| February 14, 2014

As a part of his work with eSPAN140 and the Bridge Technology Center, Dr. Karl Barth, West Virginia University, set in place measurement tools just before the deck pour on October 24.  The purpose is to monitor major axis bending and lateral flange bending during the placement of the concrete deck.

As a part of his work with eSPAN140 and the Bridge Technology Center, Dr. Karl Barth, West Virginia University, set in place measurement tools just before the deck pour on Oct. 24. The purpose is to monitor major axis bending and lateral flange bending during the placement of the concrete deck.

Buchanan County Secondary Roads plans to replace the bridge on V-65 south of Jesup, Iowa. The bridge will be replaced as part of a demonstration project using a new design software program developed by the Short Span Steel Bridge Alliance (SSSBA). Called eSPAN140, the design software is developed to provide a more economical manner of replacing bridges.

The existing bridge was built in 1947 and has a sufficiency rating of less than 50. The existing 22-foot-wide bridge was replaced with a modern 40-foot-wide bridge with galvanized steel beams and galvanized rebar. Removal of the existing bridge began on Aug. 20. The bridge construction and replacement was completed in October.

Arrangements have been made with Black Hawk County to detour traffic on the Wooster Road up to Spring Creek Road to Indian Creek Road (240th Street). Then back to County Road V-65 (Benson Shady Grove) during the bridge demolition and new bridge construction.

Buchanan County Engineer Brian Keierleber, who is spearheading the project, explains,This is an opportunity to participate on a project that that will have major cost savings the residents of Buchanan County in the short term and will develop a process to have major cost savings in the long term.

This demonstration bridge project is a joint effort with West Virginia University, the University of Wyoming and Iowa State University.

You can follow the progress of the bridge, including its fabrication, delivery and installation, on the SSSBA blog or the live, onsite webcam.

To read more about this bridge project and see completed photos, check out the February issue of Better Roads or click here.

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