DOT chief Foxx commends ongoing Superstorm Sandy recovery efforts

| October 29, 2013

Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx speaks during a visit to the Montague Tunnel on October 25, 2013. (Photo: U.S. Department of Transportation)

Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx speaks during a visit to the Montague Tunnel on October 25, 2013. (Photo: U.S. Department of Transportation)

One year after Superstorm Sandy hit the East Coast, crews are continuing to repair damages to transportation infrastructure in New York, New Jersey and other states affected by the storm.

In a blog post today, Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx notes that $1.4 billion in transportation recovery projects are in progress.

Foxx points to the Montague Tunnel project as one particular example, adding that the U.S. Department of Transportation will give $236 million. The tunnel, which was damaged when it was flooded last year, has been closed since August so workers can replace lights, signals and electrical equipment.

The 14-month project is affecting 65,000 riders, Foxx notes.

“I know there are others whose regular routes and transit service have been disrupted,” Foxx writes. “But every day in the region, some new asset is reopened, and you can rest assured that there are hard-working people on the job doing their best to get your commute back to normal as soon as possible.”

Foxx also praised the New York-based DOT employees who have continued to work toward recovery of the state’s transportation systems.

“I want to thank them for working while knowing that their own homes were damaged and in need of attention, for charging their blackberries with car batteries so they could keep working on behalf of others, and for continuing that work throughout the year,” Foxx writes.

He added that the DOT will continue to aid affected areas.

“In the year since the storm struck, we have stood with our partners every step of the way,” Foxx writes. “And we will be with them in the future, as they finish the job with transportation systems that are even stronger than before and better able to withstand future storms.”

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