Congestion jams up New Jersey Transit station after Super Bowl

| February 3, 2014

After the Super Bowl ended, train passengers were asked to remain in the stadium "due to congestion." (Photo credit: @aemaltheafghan via Instagram)

After the Super Bowl ended, train passengers were asked to remain in the stadium “due to congestion.” (Photo credit: @aemaltheafghan via Instagram)

Fans attempting to leave the MetLife Stadium after the Super Bowl on Sunday night faced delays as they waited to board overcrowded trains.

“Long lines and confusion” had train-traveling fans spending hours trying to leave the game Sunday night and early Monday morning, NJ.com reports.

According to the report, officials dubbed the game the “first mass transit Super Bowl.”

New Jersey Transit, which provides rail service to and from the stadium, brought in 20 charter buses helped alleviate congestion at midnight, when they began picking up fans to take them to Manhattan.

The last of the fans began boarding trains just before 1 a.m., the report notes.

However, post-game congestions wasn’t the only transit problem on Sunday. One train passenger told NJ.com that his commute, which is normally 45 minutes long, turned into a three-hour-long ride prior to the game.

New Jersey Transit said more than 28,000 people purchased train tickets — a record for the agency. The agency also said it carried three times as many Super Bowl fans as it does passengers during a Giants games.

By early Monday morning, 32,900 people had traveled from the MetLife station via New Jersey Transit, according to agency spokesman John Durso, Jr.

“We’ve moved more people than we’ve ever moved in and out of this place,” New Jersey Transit Executive Director Jim Weinstein told NJ.com.

New Jersey Transit told NJ.com that the agency had planned for the large crowds, preparing the charter buses before the game and opening a second track to further alleviate the long lines.

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