California’s high-speed rail could fail to meet required trip time

| March 31, 2014

California high-speed rail

(Photo Credit: California High-Speed Rail Authority)

California’s high-speed rail is supposed to transport travelers at high speeds, allowing them to travel from Los Angeles to San Francisco in just two hours and 40 minutes.

However, the bullet train may not be able to get travelers to their destinations in the anticipated amount of time.

Louis Thompson, chairman of the High-Speed Rail Peer Review Group told a California Senate panel last week that the train could take up to a half-hour longer, the Los Angeles Times reports.

Citing “real world engineering issues,” Thompson said scheduled trips won’t meet the two hour and 40 minute trip time, which is required for the project to receive the $9 billion in voter-approved borrowed funds.

The project has also faced other pitfalls, including concern over design changes and the price tag that has nearly doubled from $33 billion to $68.4 billion.

The L.A. Times notes that the trip time extension could affect a proposal that would allocate $250 million in greenhouse gas taxes to the high-speed rail project.

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